Navigating the world of food sensitivities can feel like walking through a minefield, especially when lectins are the culprits. You might have heard that these protein-packed particles can wreak havoc on sensitive stomachs, but figuring out where they’re hiding is another story. We’re breaking down some of the foods that are lectin landmines for those with sensitivities. Grab a notepad, because you’re going to want to remember these tips next time you’re grocery shopping or planning a meal.

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Tomatoes

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Tomatoes, renowned for their role in salads and sauces, also contain significant amounts of lectins. Individuals with lectin sensitivities should consider peeling and deseeding tomatoes to reduce lectin intake.

Potatoes

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As staple comfort foods, potatoes also contain high levels of lectins. Those with lectin sensitivities may need to limit consumption of potatoes or seek alternative starch sources.

Goji Berries

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Despite their superfood status, goji berries are high in lectins. Individuals looking to minimize lectin exposure should cook goji berries thoroughly or avoid them altogether.

Eggplant

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Eggplants are notable for their lectin content. For those sensitive to lectins, avoiding raw eggplant or ensuring it is well-cooked may be advisable to mitigate potential effects.

Lentils

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Lentils, a staple in vegetarian cuisine, are laden with lectins. Soaking and thoroughly cooking lentils can reduce their lectin content, making them safer for those with sensitivities.

Beans

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Beans contain high levels of lectins, which can be reduced through soaking and cooking. Individuals with lectin sensitivities should take these steps to enjoy beans more safely.

Peanuts

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Peanuts, a popular snack, also contain lectins, posing a risk to those with sensitivities. Choosing alternative snacks or nuts with lower lectin levels may be beneficial.

Soybeans

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Soybeans contain lectins, which can be problematic for sensitive individuals. Fermented soy products, which have lower lectin content, may be a safer option.

Cashews

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Cashews, despite their appealing taste and texture, contain lectins. Those managing lectin sensitivities may need to select nuts with lower lectin levels for their diets.

Quinoa

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Quinoa contains lectins, which can be minimized through thorough rinsing. However, individuals with a focus on lectin reduction might need to moderate their quinoa intake.

Peppers

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Peppers, both sweet and spicy, are sources of lectins. Cooking peppers can reduce their lectin content, making them more suitable for those with dietary restrictions related to lectins.

15 Foods We Hated As Kids But Now Can’t Live Without

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Remember those foods we used to push around on our plates, hoping they’d somehow disappear when we weren’t looking? Now they’ve somehow become the foods we love most. It’s funny how things change once you’re all grown up. This list is a shout-out to those foods we used to avoid like the plague but now find ourselves craving on the regular.

See Them Here: 15 Foods We Hated As Kids But Now Can’t Live Without

These Are 9 Of The Worst Movie Snacks And Here’s Why

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You’re cozied up for movie night, the screen is glowing, and then it happens: your snack choice turns the evening south. It’s a universal truth that not all snacks are created equal, especially when it comes to enjoying them in front of a movie. Here are the top 9 snacks in no particular order that have a notorious reputation for dampening the movie-watching vibe.

See them here: These Are 9 Of The Worst Movie Snacks And Here’s Why

10 Foods That Have Priced Themselves Out Of Our Shopping Carts Lately

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Ever noticed how some grocery items have gone from ‘yeah, let’s grab it’ to ‘wait, how much?!’ lately? We’re looking at a bunch of foods that have gotten so expensive, we’re just shaking our heads and putting them back on the shelf. From breakfast staples to quick dinner fixes, let’s talk about the stuff that’s not making the cut anymore and how whipping up alternatives at home might just be the wallet-friendly (and fun) way to go.

See them here: 10 Foods That Have Priced Themselves Out Of Our Shopping Carts Lately

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Founder and Writer at Running to the Kitchen | About

Gina Matsoukas is an AP syndicated writer. She is the founder, photographer and recipe developer of Running to the Kitchen — a food website focused on providing healthy, wholesome recipes using fresh and seasonal ingredients. Her work has been featured in numerous media outlets both digital and print, including MSN, Huffington post, Buzzfeed, Women’s Health and Food Network.

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