Do you ever finish a meal and immediately regret it? If certain foods leave you feeling bloated or uncomfortable, it might be time to reconsider your diet. We’ve rounded up 12 foods that are notorious for causing digestive issues in some people. Ditch these and you might just notice a smoother, more comfortable digestion.

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Goji Berries

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Despite their superfood status, goji berries are high in lectins. Individuals looking to minimize lectin exposure should cook goji berries thoroughly or avoid them altogether.

Tomatoes

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Tomatoes, renowned for their role in salads and sauces, also contain significant amounts of lectins. Individuals with lectin sensitivities should consider peeling and deseeding tomatoes to reduce lectin intake.

Potatoes

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As staple comfort foods, potatoes also contain high levels of lectins. Those with lectin sensitivities may need to limit consumption of potatoes or seek alternative starch sources.

Eggplant

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Eggplants are notable for their lectin content. For those sensitive to lectins, avoiding raw eggplant or ensuring it is well-cooked may be advisable to mitigate potential effects.

Lentils

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Lentils, a staple in vegetarian cuisine, are laden with lectins. Soaking and thoroughly cooking lentils can reduce their lectin content, making them safer for those with sensitivities.

Beans

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Beans contain high levels of lectins, which can be reduced through soaking and cooking. Individuals with lectin sensitivities should take these steps to enjoy beans more safely.

Peanuts

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Peanuts, a popular snack, also contain lectins, posing a risk to those with sensitivities. Choosing alternative snacks or nuts with lower lectin levels may be beneficial.

Corn

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Corn, often mistaken for a vegetable, is actually a grain and, like most grains, it contains high levels of lectins. Given its status as one of the largest crops and a prevalent ingredient in numerous products—such as corn syrup, cornstarch, breakfast cereals, and corn chips—corn is a common yet significant source of lectins in many diets that would be better off avoided by those with digestive issues.

Soybeans

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Soybeans contain lectins, which can be problematic for sensitive individuals. Fermented soy products, which have lower lectin content, may be a safer option.

Cashews

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Cashews, despite their appealing taste and texture, contain lectins. Those managing lectin sensitivities may need to select nuts with lower lectin levels for their diets.

Peppers

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Peppers, both sweet and spicy, are sources of lectins. Cooking peppers can reduce their lectin content, making them more suitable for those with dietary restrictions related to lectins.

Quinoa

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Quinoa contains lectins, which can be minimized through thorough rinsing. However, individuals with a focus on lectin reduction might need to moderate their quinoa intake.

12 Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren’t

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It’s easy to be fooled by foods that carry a healthy label but don’t live up to the hype. From snack bars packed with sugar to salads drenched in high-calorie dressing, misleading healthy foods are everywhere. We’re uncovering the top foods you might think are good for you but could actually sabotage your diet.

Read it Here: 12 Foods You Think Are Healthy But Aren’t

11 Secret Foods to Unlock Your Best Sleep Ever

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Struggling to catch those elusive z’s? What you eat before bed can be the key to unlocking a night of deep, restorative sleep. We’ve rounded up 11 surprising foods that have the power to calm your mind and prepare your body for some serious shut-eye. Ready to turn your dinner plate into a sleep-inducing powerhouse?

Read it Here: 11 Secret Foods to Unlock Your Best Sleep Ever

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Founder and Writer at Running to the Kitchen | About

Gina Matsoukas is an AP syndicated writer. She is the founder, photographer and recipe developer of Running to the Kitchen — a food website focused on providing healthy, wholesome recipes using fresh and seasonal ingredients. Her work has been featured in numerous media outlets both digital and print, including MSN, Huffington post, Buzzfeed, Women’s Health and Food Network.

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